The Beginning of Everything by Robyn Schneider

the beginning

Just a few weeks ago, a favorite former student recommended The Beginning of Everything by Robyn Schneider.

“I got you a copy,” he said, reaching in to his backpack as we passed each other headed to homeroom.

 We’d exchanged books throughout his 7th grade year and titles as we passed in the halls this year.  I knew I had to read this book ASAP.

The Beginning of Everything has a strong voice and a great hook.  Well, two hooks that literally will make you gasp out loud.  You’ll love the narrator even when he can’t stand himself and you’ll never see the end coming.  I guarantee it.

High School can be a cruel place when you go from being star of the varsity tennis team to second string on the debate team.  Read about Ezra’s journey and how he bounces back. Kind of.

Robyn Schneider’s The Beginning of Everything has romance, tragedy and, believe it or not, a generous dose of humor. You’ll love it.

 

There’s one key difference between kids who excel at math and those who don’t

byrdonbooks:

Very interesting post…it’s good to know that there is hope for my kids and math. I believed in “Im not a math person.”

Originally posted on Quartz:

“I’m just not a math person.”

We hear it all the time. And we’ve had enough. Because we believe that the idea of “math people” is the most self-destructive idea in America today. The truth is, you probably are a math person, and by thinking otherwise, you are possibly hamstringing your own career. Worse, you may be helping to perpetuate a pernicious myth that is harming underprivileged children—the myth of inborn genetic math ability.

Is math ability genetic? Sure, to some degree. Terence Tao, UCLA’s famous virtuoso mathematician, publishes dozens of papers in top journals every year, and is sought out by researchers around the world to help with the hardest parts of their theories. Essentially none of us could ever be as good at math as Terence Tao, no matter how hard we tried or how well we were taught. But here’s the thing: We don’t have to!…

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Stying Librarian: Pull up a chair, it’s Saturday book share and bonus author interview: ChinAlive

byrdonbooks:

Bob Jonas’s book ChinAlive reviewed. I’ve got my copy!

Originally posted on The Styling Librarian:

CHINALIVE book cover

CHINALIVE book cover

Last week I began a new blog theme, “Pull up a chair, it’s a Saturday Book Share, any other book bloggers want to join me?

I decided to feature ChinAlive on this Saturday’s post since it was a book I enjoyed taking my time reading…. Please note, I know this author and received a review copy of this self-published book.
ChinAlive by Bob Jonas- For middle school/high school readers who love an excellent action thriller.

Bob Jonas’s Site: http://vagabondlibrarian.com/?p=328

I like how this book’s preface features a folk tale… and then begins officially with a kidnapping. I appreciate how you have a great glimpse at the life of an expat living in China. Bob Jonas knows how to keep up the pace through a book that has tricky twists and turns introducing his fictional account of three teenage boys who are drawn into a dark yet hopeful organization…

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The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate (absolutely not) Reviewed by Donalyn Miller

byrdonbooks:

You’ll need a Kleenex to read this Absolutely-not-a-review of the wonderful the One and Only Ivan.

Originally posted on Nerdy Book Club:

On two occasions, Colby, Cindy, and I have declined contributors’ offers for book reviews even though we loved the book. We did not review Linda Urban’s Hound Dog True—the book that launched the idea for Nerdy Book Club—until almost a year after the blog began. And in spite of constant mention in tweets and Nerdy Book Club blog posts and book lists, we have never posted a review of The One and Only Ivan.

Are you surprised? I can wait while you google it. You won’t find one, but go ahead.

Although we championed Ivan from the very start, we turned down over twenty requests to review the book. When The One and Only Ivan won the 2013 Newbery Medal earlier this year, we stopped getting review queries. The Nerdy Book Club was such a vocal supporter of Katherine and Ivan’s story that most contributors assumed we had…

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New Classroom Rules

byrdonbooks:

This blog post on classroom rules really gives me the giggles.

Originally posted on Little Miss Perfect:

1. Enter the room and socialize at your leisure. The daily “warm-up” is just a suggestion that is not in any way intended to promote the acquisition of grammar skills over necessary social interactions.

2. Every time you enter the room, please be sure to ask me if we’re watching a movie. I may have neglected to plan a movie, and will quickly be reminded that a feature-length film, however loosely connected to the curriculum, will be both more entertaining and more instructive than whatever lesson I had originally planned.

3. Sit wherever you want. If you feel like sitting. Standing up is good, too, or sitting on top of the chair and rocking in it. It’s important for those of you who are kinesthetic learners to feel comfortable.

4. Please don’t put your name on any papers that you turn in, especially on multiple choice quizzes. I enjoy challenging…

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Eighth Graders, tell us what you really think….

Seventh Graders, vote for your favorite summer reading book.

Top Ten Middle Grade Audio Books to Make the Long Car Ride Bearable for Everyone by Kathy Cowie

byrdonbooks:

My kids love audiobooks in the car. Here are some great suggestions….

Originally posted on Nerdy Book Club:

During the summer, my family spends a lot of time in the car. We have portable TVs for trips over six hours, but for everything else, we have audiobooks. We have downloaded some, but most we borrow from our local library. They have a large selection, and you can rent an individual device if you can’t agree on a book.

In the beginning, my husband and I imagined we were great parents — doing something just for the kids. But we found out quickly that the stories were fun for everyone. Some lasted over a couple of weekend trips, so we sometimes had to tell Grandma or other random guests, “Sorry, we’re in the middle of the story, here’s what you missed.”

If you are worried about the “reading” value for your children, a Forbes magazine article “Is Listening to Audio Books Really the Same as Reading?” referenced several studies…

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Save all libraries AND their librarians

Author Adam Gidwitz posted this video to Facebook. It’s about a New York City school trying to save their library.

Today, my dear friend and my school’s media specialist retires. Her postion will not be filled. Our library will no longer have a full-time media specialist or be open all day everyday.

In my district, and probably in may others, it is a fiscal decision. I think the belief is that with technology, there is not the need for library research so the funding is being diverted to other areas. Libraries are not just about research.

School libraries are communities nurtured by librarians who love books and love sharing them with children.

It is a shame to think that collections in schools across the country will essentially be abandoned and the face-to-face library experience will be gone. It is an even greater shame that people who’ve devoted their careers to fostering a love of reading won’t be able to do that anymore.